Good Paying, High Risk Careers

Considering a Career and Don’t Mind the Risk?

Ever watch those reality TV shows about Alaskan gold miners, oil riggers or deep sea fisherman and wish you could be where they are? Before you become an ice road trucker, be sure to evaluate the pros and cons of your new job. Here are some of the most dangerous jobs in the U.S. as well as their average salaries, based on the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data for 2012.

Construction Laborers

Construction Laborers have dangerous jobs. The fatal injury rate (per 100,000 workers) is at 17.4, or a total of 210 fatal injuries in 2012. Seems like a lot of risk for a career estimated to gross $34,490 in 2012.

Farmers, Ranchers and Other Agricultural Managers

Perhaps instead of checking the weather, these agricultural-minded folks should review this forecast: 21.3 per 100,000 workers met with a fatal work accident in 2012 for 216 deaths. The mean average wage is $73,730, which may make that risk more acceptable. Perhaps it’s not so much about the statistics as it is a love of the land and tradition handed down through generations of family.

Drivers/Sales Workers and Truck Drivers

The annual mean wage for this group of workers is $36,710. That seems like a small wage when compared to the fatality rate of 22.1 per 100,000. This category includes taxi drivers, chauffeurs, delivery service drivers, and tractor-trailer truck drivers. Driver fatigue contributes to 12% of all truck accidents.

Electrical Power-Line Installers and Repairers

23.0 out of each 100,000 workers suffered a fatal work accident in 2012. The annual median wage is just over $60K ($62,280).  The work is physically demanding, working with high-voltage electrical wires, often at great heights. Installers and repairers also often work irregular hours, including nights and weekends in emergency situations.

Refuse and Recyclable Materials Collectors

Refuse and recyclable materials collectors earn a mean annual wage of $35,230. In exchange, they deal with a high rate of fatalities (27.1 per 100,000 workers). Job duties include operating hoisting devices, driving trucks, and dumping collected materials in the elements.

Structural Iron and Steel Workers

37.0 fatal work accidents per 100,000 for a mean wage of $50,740 per year. Performing dangerous jobs in all sorts of weather, iron and steel workers install beams, girders, and columns to create structure for buildings and bridges.

Roofers

It’s no surprise that roofers suffer a high fatality rate with their dangerous job. Combining steep pitches, uneven footing and slippery surfaces – while using both hands for labor – create 40.5 deaths per 100,000 workers. Wearing protective harnesses and installing netting can help reduce the risk of death.

Aircraft Pilots and Flight Engineers

With an average annual salary of $111,960, aircraft pilots and flight engineers receive better-than-average compensation for their dangerous careers: 53.4 deaths per 100,000 workers. Long work hours and testing new or experimental aircraft lead to the fatality rates.

Fishers and Related Fishing Workers

Working in extreme environmental conditions as well as the possibility of drowning contribute to a fatality rate of 117 – the second-highest according BLS. There’s not always a huge paycheck to compensate for this danger, either – the mean salary is just $36,900 per year.

Logging Workers

According to the BLS, logging is the most dangerous career, with 127.8 fatal accidents per 100,000 workers. Logging workers earned an average of $35,140 in 2012. Harvesting trees while dealing with whatever the weather brings, usually in remote locations, makes this job extremely hazardous.

Is Online College Right for Me?

Online college is becoming a very popular choice for students, especially if they have to work and go to school at the same time. The major benefit of online school is that it allows you to fit your classes into your busy schedule. This is because you can literally complete all of you schoolwork at a time that is most convenient for you. However, online college is not right for all students. There are some questions you should ask yourself, to help you decide if online college is right for you or not.

What Type of Personality Do You Have?

First, you want to consider if your personality is conducive to attending school online. Are you self-motivated enough to get the work done on time? Do you have good organizational and time-management skills? All of these will be extremely important for you to be successful at taking classes online. You may also want to consider how sociable you are and if you are energized by being around other people. If you are working outside you home, this may not be an issue, but it is still something you should consider.

 

How Do You Learn Best?

Think about how you learn best. Are you good a good audio learner or do you need someone to show you something in order to learn? Online learning is done completely over the internet, so you will need to be able to listen or read the instructions and information provided, and be able to process it. If you learn best by someone showing you how to do something, online learning may not be the best option for you.

 

Do You Have the Time for Schoolwork?

You also need to honestly ask yourself if you have time to commit to going to college online. Just because you do not have to go to the classroom does not mean you will not have a lot of work to do. In fact, the time it takes to complete online schoolwork is similar or maybe even more than college courses taken in the classroom setting.

 

Do You Have the Right Tools?

Finally, you must make sure that you have the right tools necessary to take online classes. You will need to have a computer or laptop that has some type of word processing program on it. You will also need a stable internet line, since you will need to take all of your classes online. If you do not have these items at home, you may be able to access them at your public library. If you do decide to use the library, you must make sure that the times it is opened coincides with the time you have available to do your work.
If after answering the questions above you have decided to take online classes, you can begin the process by applying to several online schools. Be certain that the online college you decide to attend is accredited and offers the courses you are interested in taking. After enrolling, you should be assigned an academic advisor, who can help you through the online process and answer any of your questions.

Benefits of Going to College as an Older Adult

Some Benefits of Attending College as an Older Adult

Returning to college as an older adult is becoming more and more popular. In fact, according to findings by the Digest of Education Statistics, the number of students over the age of 25 enrolling in college increased 43 percent from 2000 to 2009. Part of this increase may have been caused by the recent increase in the unemployment, which may have forced some people into new career. However, the trend does not seem to be slowing down, even as the unemployment levels improve. This may be because many older adults are finding some great benefits of going back to school as an older adult.

Improved Job Opportunities

The number one reason why older adults go back to school is to improve their job opportunities. Some students are looking for a completely new career choice that not only will they enjoy more, but will pay them more. Others are looking to stay in the same career field, and just want to enhance upon their skills and training. They believe this extra education will land them a higher level job position or encourage their employer to give them a raise.

More Prepared

Older adults are typically more prepared for schooling and excited to learn. Many of them either regret not going to college when they were younger or wish they had pay more attention in class. They also are more disciplined and ready to learn. This revelation, typically allows the older adult to not just enjoy college more, but to actually perform better too.

Bring Life Experience to the Table

Older adults bring with them a wealth of life and job experiences. These experiences often allow them to perform better in the classroom. This is especially true if the student is going to college for the same field for which they are currently working. This life experience, as well as, connections they have made through the years is also likely to help them land a good job after graduation.

Tips for Going College as an Older Adult

If you are an older adult and planning to go back to school, there are several things to consider that can help you plan for college and reach your goals.

Funding

Funding is often the one obstacle that holds older adults from going back to school. When paying for college make sure that you apply for financial aid, even if you think that you will not qualify. You may be surprise and even a little help is better than none. You should also look for scholarships that are geared towards older adults. Finally, check with your current employer and see if they offer a tuition reimbursement program that might cover some of your expenses.

Work experience

If you plan to stop working to go back to school, try to volunteer at the school or local organization. You can even think about running a club at your college that is related to your career choice. This will help you when it comes time to apply for job because it can help fill in the gap in your work history.

Online college

Online colleges are great for older adults going back to school. It can allow you to continue working and then finish your school work at a time that is convenient for you. Just be sure that you the online college you select is accredited and reputable.

Going to college as an older adult can be a great decision. The main thing you want to be sure of before signing up for any classes is that you have both the time and money set aside for your education. Once this is accomplished, you will be happy that you took the time to improve your training level and you are more likely to be able to improve you job outlook.

Am I too Old for Law School?

Most people will tell you that it is never too late to change careers and land the job you have always wanted. What if your new career choice is to become a lawyer? Well, the training and experience requirements may add to the challenges you face when entering a new career as a lawyer. However, becoming a lawyer at any age is certainly attainable, the main question is rather is it plausible to become a lawyer later in life.  The answer to this question depends on your specific set of circumstances.

Law School Requirements

Each state has its own requirements for admissions to the bar. In almost all states, a person must first successfully graduate from an accredited law school. Law school typically takes about three additional years after your receive your Bachelor’s Degree. Most accredited law schools also require students to take the LSAT (Law School Admissions Test) before being accepted into that school. In addition to successfully completely law school, most states also require a person to pass the bar exams that are offered in their state.

Things to Consider

With this being said, the first step for most people to becoming a lawyer is to go to law school. To determine if you are too old to go to law school, you should consider the following things.

1. Are you prepared for the LSAT exam?

Since almost all accredited law schools require you to take the LSAT before admittance, you must ask yourself if you know enough about law to take this test. Check online or purchase a LSAT practice book to see where your current skill level is. If you do not initially score well, you know that you need to take several months and study for this intense exam. This will also provide you with some good study habits that you will need to make it through law school.

2. Do you have the time?

One of the top issues that people face when considering going to law school is their lack of time, due to family and other commitments. You need to honestly evaluate your time and determine if you have the appropriate time to set aside to complete law school. Keep in mind that a typical law school program takes three years to complete.

3. Do you have enough money?

You also need to secure enough funding to pay for all three years of law school. If you are considering taking out a loan, be sure that you have enough working years left to pay back the loan and still save for your retirement. You also need to consider any relocation expenses you may curtail by going to law school.

4. Is there a demand for lawyers in your area?

Before heading off to law school make sure that there is a demand for lawyers in your area. Feel free to contact several lawyers in your area and ask them their opinion about the demand in your area. This may also help you determine what specialty in law you want to select, while at law school.

5. Is this the right career choice for you?

The last thing you want to do is spend three years and a lot of money going to law school, only to find out that you really do not like the job. Talk to a local lawyer and see if you can shadow them for several days. You may find out that being a lawyer is as much fun as you thought.

Once you take a closer look at the answers to these questions, you will be able to determine if law school is right for you or not. Remember that you are never too old to start law school; the main question is if now is the right time in your life for more schooling. If you can make the commitment both personally and financially, then you are already over the first hurdle on your path to a new career.

Becoming a Private Tutor, a Great Choice for Many

So You’re Thinking of Being a Private Tutor?

For many people who enjoy the field of education but don’t want to commit to teaching, private tutoring can be a great way to work with students. As a private tutor, you will work individually with students of all ages on homework help, test prep, general academic subjects—essentially, whatever you want to provide help with. You will probably work in sessions of an hour to two hours in length, depending on the age and needs of your student. You can set up recurring sessions for students who need help weekly, special test prep sessions before standardized tests, and review sessions before students have tests and finals in school. In short, the type of work and the amount of time you work are dictated by you and the demand for your tutoring services.

Some of the perks of working as a private tutor include getting to know students personally, only working in subjects that you enjoy and feel comfortable with, setting your own hours and rates, choosing your clients, and knowing that you have helped children and young adults improve. As a rewarding career that requires less time and preparation than teaching, tutoring can be a viable option for education-minded professionals.

Ways to Wow with Your Resume

According to the website of OriginsTutoring.com, a tutoring private tutoring company in New York, NY: “Before you start marketing yourself as a tutor, you may want to decide which areas you will specialize in. For many people, this will be influenced by undergraduate or graduate studies, as well as jobs held in the workforce.” For example, someone who would like to begin tutoring math will be more successful if he or she has an academic background in math or has held jobs requiring quantitative skills, while someone who has studied literature or worked in a writing-intensive field will have more credibility as a potential writing tutor.

Of course, there are many ways to stand out when you decide that you would like to tutor. In addition to listing relevant academic work or jobs, it will be helpful to provide information about any tutoring positions you have held. Be prepared to give recommendations from past clients if possible, or to share your own test scores (primarily from the SAT, ACT, GRE, etc.) if you want to work as a test prep tutor.

While there are no current certification or qualification processes for potential tutors, your best assets will be to show that you are knowledgeable about your subjects and to demonstrate your ability to answer questions that students may have.

How to Get the Word Out

If pursuing a full- or part-time career in personal tutoring sounds like a good match for your lifestyle, there are several ways for you to get started. You can join a tutoring company, which will help you find students. You will most likely have the chance to meet students at the company’s office or make house calls, but you will need to allow the company to set your rates and take a percentage of your earnings. However, working directly with a tutoring company can help you get the start you need before you have a strong reputation. Similarly, you can partner with an online tutoring site and offer tutoring services over the internet, but be prepared for lower rates and less regular students. The final option is to strike out alone—use friends as resources to find students who want a tutor, browse Craigslist or local classifieds, and see if you can advertise at local schools. Once you develop a reputation with students, you will be able to network better and to reach a larger clientele.

Your ability to succeed as a tutor will depend on your work with students, the results you achieve, and the references that you can provide. While it may be difficult to start building a tutoring reputation from scratch, having one good experience with a student can lead to many more jobs. It’s a great career to pursue for those who like to work independently and to feel like their job is actively helping others succeed.

LSAT Study Resources

Anyone heading to law school knows how extremely important the LSAT (Law School Admission Test) scores are to helping them gain acceptance into the school of their choice. In fact, almost every accredited law school in the county requires their potential students to submit their scores along with the application. Law schools use the results from this test as a predictor of how well the student is likely to perform in their law program. With this much riding on just one test, it is vital that you prepare and study for this exam ahead of time.

The LSAT Exam

The LSAT is created and administered by the LSAC (Law School Admission Council) and is only offered four times per year. The test is broken down into four main sections, including logical reasoning, reading comprehension, analytical reasoning, and the essay. The test is scored on a scale from 120 to 180, with 180 being the highest score possible. Participants are allowed to take the test up to three times within any two year period. However, it is important to realize that school typically receives all of your scores and averages them together versus only looking at your highest score.

Take a Practice Test

The first step to studying for the LSAT exam is to take a practice test. The LSAC website offers one free test with answers for students to practice. There are several other websites that also provide free testing of the LSAT exam. This is a good place to start because it will give you an idea of what the actual exam is like, and it can alert you to any section you make need to study more. Some sites provide a complete breakdown of your score and gives suggestions of areas you need to study.

Use Online Resources

The LSAC website also offers other free online resources to help you study. There are numerous online companies that provide learning tools online to help you prepare for this test. These tools can be very helpful, but you must be careful where you purchase your material. Look for a company that has been providing LSAT test preparation services for at least several years. You should also read some online reviews, to make sure previous customers found their services helpful.

Workshops and Help Centers

In addition to online resources, many companies also offer workshops held at different locations around the country. There may also be a help center near you that can provide you with one-on-one tutoring services to help you prepare for the test. Some of these services can be rather expensive, but can often help you get the results you need to get into the law school you want. You can also purchase workbooks and test preparation kits that you can use at your home at times that are convenient for you.

The LSAC highly recommends that you at least take the practice test when preparing for you LSAT exam. However, as important as this exam is for your future career, it is a good idea to take some time and really study for this test. One bad score could really hurt your chances of getting into a good law school. So, take advantage of all the great LSAT resources available and head into your test well-prepared.

Going Back to College as an Older Adult

Benefits of Going to College as an Older Adult

Returning to college as an older adult is becoming more and more popular. In fact, according to findings by the Digest of Education Statistics, the number of students over the age of 25 enrolling in college increased 43 percent from 2000 to 2009. Part of this increase may have been caused by the recent increase in the unemployment, which may have forced some people into new career. However, the trend does not seem to be slowing down, even as the unemployment levels improve. This may be because many older adults are finding some great benefits of going back to school as an older adult.

Improved Job Opportunities

The number one reason why older adults go back to school is to improve their job opportunities. Some students are looking for a completely new career choice that not only will they enjoy more, but will pay them more. Others are looking to stay in the same career field, and just want to enhance upon their skills and training. They believe this extra education will land them a higher level job position or encourage their employer to give them a raise.

More Prepared

Older adults are typically more prepared for schooling and excited to learn. Many of them either regret not going to college when they were younger or wish they had pay more attention in class. They also are more disciplined and ready to learn. This revelation, typically allows the older adult to not just enjoy college more, but to actually perform better too.

Bring Life Experience to the Table

Older adults bring with them a wealth of life and job experiences. These experiences often allow them to perform better in the classroom. This is especially true if the student is going to college for the same field for which they are currently working. This life experience, as well as, connections they have made through the years is also likely to help them land a good job after graduation.

Tips for Going College as an Older Adult

If you are an older adult and planning to go back to school, there are several things to consider that can help you plan for college and reach your goals.

  •  Funding

Funding is often the one obstacle that holds older adults from going back to school. When paying for college make sure that you apply for financial aid, even if you think that you will not qualify. You may be surprise and even a little help is better than none. You should also look for scholarships that are geared towards older adults. Finally, check with your current employer and see if they offer a tuition reimbursement program that might cover some of your expenses.

  • Work experience

If you plan to stop working to go back to school, try to volunteer at the school or local organization. You can even think about running a club at your college that is related to your career choice. This will help you when it comes time to apply for job because it can help fill in the gap in your work history.

  • Online college

Online colleges are great for older adults going back to school. It can allow you to continue working and then finish your school work at a time that is convenient for you. Just be sure that you the online college you select is accredited and reputable.

Going to college as an older adult can be a great decision. The main thing you want to be sure of before signing up for any classes is that you have both the time and money set aside for your education. Once this is accomplished, you will be happy that you took the time to improve your training level and you are more likely to be able to improve you job outlook.

Is Online College Right for Me?

Online College: A Good Choice for Some But Not for Everyone

Online college is becoming a very popular choice for students, especially if they have to work and go to school at the same time. The major benefit of online school is that it allows you to fit your classes into your busy schedule. This is because you can literally complete all of you schoolwork at a time that is most convenient for you. However, online college is not right for all students. There are some questions you should ask yourself, to help you decide if online college is right for you or not.

What Type of Personality Do You Have?

First, you want to consider if your personality is conducive to attending school online. Are you self-motivated enough to get the work done on time? Do you have good organizational and time-management skills? All of these will be extremely important for you to be successful at taking classes online. You may also want to consider how sociable you are and if you are energized by being around other people. If you are working outside you home, this may not be an issue, but it is still something you should consider.

How Do You Learn Best?

Think about how you learn best. Are you good a good audio learner or do you need someone to show you something in order to learn? Online learning is done completely over the internet, so you will need to be able to listen or read the instructions and information provided, and be able to process it. If you learn best by someone showing you how to do something, online learning may not be the best option for you.

Do You Have the Time for Schoolwork?

You also need to honestly ask yourself if you have time to commit to going to college online. Just because you do not have to go to the classroom does not mean you will not have a lot of work to do. In fact, the time it takes to complete online schoolwork is similar or maybe even more than college courses taken in the classroom setting.

Do You Have the Right Tools?

Finally, you must make sure that you have the right tools necessary to take online classes. You will need to have a computer or laptop that has some type of word processing program on it. You will also need a stable internet line, since you will need to take all of your classes online. If you do not have these items at home, you may be able to access them at your public library. If you do decide to use the library, you must make sure that the times it is opened coincides with the time you have available to do your work.

If after answering the questions above you have decided to take online classes, you can begin the process by applying to several online schools. Be certain that the online college you decide to attend is accredited and offers the courses you are interested in taking. After enrolling, you should be assigned an academic advisor, who can help you through the online process and answer any of your questions.

Music Lessons: A Great Idea at Any Age

Life Long Learning: Music Lessons for Adults

Man Playing Ukelele

Man Playing Ukelele

Learning is a life long process and does not need to cease at any age. Granted some things do become more difficult to master as we get older but this does not mean that we should feel as if the pursuit of new skills is futile and this is especially true of music and music lessons. While it is true that it takes many, many years to master an instrument and learn to play at the professional level one can learn how to play many instruments well enough to enjoy themselves in a very short time. This of course depends on numerous variables such as the quality of the music teacher, the difficulty of the instrument, and the time and regularity devoted to practice. Below you will find some suggestions on getting the most out of your music lessons from MusikaLessons.com, a national leader in music education:

Take the time to Choose the Right Teacher

There are many different music teachers out there and each has his or her unique approach to teaching. Don’t be afraid to shop around a little bit and speak with potential teachers before committing to a longer study with any one teacher. Many teachers will offer a free introductory level and this is a great way to get to know a few different teachers. Keep in mind that just because a teacher is a great musician he or she is not automatically a great teacher as the act of effective teaching requires its own set of skills including patience, communication, and organization.

Be Realistic About Your Goals

It is true that you can accomplish anything you put your mind to, but just because something is true does not mean it is easy. Be realistic about your goals and understand that while it is not impossible learning a new skill is difficult at any age and this is especially true of playing a musical instrument. Do not get too far ahead of yourself or set goals or practice schedules that you can not keep. Most instruments require you to hold positions that your body may not be used to- the holding of a violin bow or the pressing down of acoustic guitar strings for example, and so you must give your body time to gain the necessary endurance to practice for long periods of time. In the beginning committing to 15 or even 10 minutes a day can show some results if coupled with a competent teacher. Build yourself up to practice 30 minutes each day and you will be amazed at the progress you make.

Don’t Be Afraid to Experiment

You should always be sure to practice the material your instructor gives you, but it is quite alright and is actually encouraged to experiment with your instrument. Strum a guitar  chord in a different rhythm or put a few chords together that you have never put together before. Does it sound good? If it does not that is okay, just try something else until you get a sound that you like.

The study of music can be enjoyed at any age. If you set realistic goals and are committed to your instrument and practice schedule you will develop a new skill that can be enjoyed for years to come. Click the following link for more information on music lessons in your area.

Am I too Old to Take the SAT Test?

Never Too Old for the SAT

Are you worried about taking (or retaking) the SAT because of your age? You shouldn’t be. If you are thinking of going to college, transferring from a community college to a school that requires test scores, or if you just want to show your knowledge to employers in a quantifiable way, taking the SAT is a great way to ensure your success.

There is no age limit to the SAT: most test takers are high school students, but there is no rule barring older people. It may feel strange to walk into a room filled with anxious high school students, but your future is just as important as theirs.  In fact, taking the SAT later can actually improve your score!

Real Life Experience

The years after college bring priceless life experience, which you can highlight in the essay section.  Since the essay section requires each test taker to create a short writing sample from scratch, you and the high school students taking the test will be on equal footing in all areas but one: you will have more real-world experience to draw from.  This can allow you to add more detail to arguments drawn from history, or write on current events with deeper insight, or write something that the SAT graders can more easily relate to.  You may also have stronger reasoning skills than younger students, simply because you have had more time to hone these skills.  This can help you in the critical reading and math sections, because you will need logic and quantitative skills in order to solve these problems quickly and effectively.  You may also have a stronger vocabulary than high school students because of experience in a professional work environment.  Regardless of your reasons for considering it, the SAT can be an excellent standardized test option if you want to prove to others what you know, and it is never too late to start studying for it.

Private Tutoring

The downside to taking the SAT later is that you will be several years removed from the high school classes that originally prepared you to take the SAT. For some subjects, such as the critical reading section, you may not struggle at all. However, you may find when taking a practice test that you’ve forgotten the math formulas you need to solve problems, or you may struggle to write a coherent, strong essay that readers will enjoy.  Since high school students are drilled daily in math facts and have to write almost constantly, someone who takes the SAT during high school may have an advantage.  However, it is not difficult to relearn concepts you once knew, so a little review can go a long way in terms of boosting your score.

If you feel like you need a refresher in any of the SAT sections, consider private SAT tutoring.  A spokesperson from Origins Tutoring, a company that offers SAT tutoring,  said that they have worked with many students young and old and have always seen benefits of tutoring no matter what the age. If you live in a larger city such as NYC, most private tutors will offer at-home sessions so you may not even have to leave your living room to get quality SAT test prep!  If you do not live in a larger sity, you could consider online private tutoring.  An online or in-person SAT tutor can quickly discover areas where you are struggling, then present simple, no-nonsense ways for you to improve. The private tutor can explain math concepts you’ve forgotten, help you outline and write essay prompts, and create practice questions to test your knowledge. The private tutor will make you feel involved and in charge of each study session, which will in turn make tutoring an enjoyable, rewarding experience for you.

If you hire an tutor, an added benefit is flexibility. You will most likely have limited free time in which to study, and a private SAT tutor can help you maximize the effectiveness of these study sessions. A private tutor will suggest the best ways for you to work through practice tests and questions, so that you cover the material you need to, but still have time for all your obligations.  With the time and location of the study sessions up to you, there’s no excuse to not study!

If you’re taking the SAT at an atypical age, try out private tutoring in to see how you can benefit! The help and support you will receive from such a tutor could be invaluable leading up to and on your test date.  A private tutor will be committed to helping you reach your personal best, and with a tutor’s help, the SAT process will be much easier.

 

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